animation in 3+ mins (missing some details ofc) (by Fiona Pang 09)

animation in 3+ mins (missing some details ofc) (by Fiona Pang 09)


no idea how i am supposed to do this in 2-3 minutes but lets try eh *groan of despair* (i sound wayy to enthusiastic) There is 3 Types of animation 2D, 3D and stop motion but we are not talking about stop motion cause it is NOT DIGITAL LETS START WITH 2D ANIMATION! (wayy too enthusiastic) For example, if you wanna animate this ball you can create a new frame use this tool (why did i say tool like that?!) Move the ball create another frame Move the ball again~ and use this other tOoL(again, why did i say it like that?!) to insert the amount of frames you want in between -for-example-if-you-put-5- you’ll end up with something like this But WHAT IF you put…. (love the pause) 10 instead of 5?… well. you get something… (yes, ill get something, ofc!) Like. This you can see it is smoother and slower That was tweening, next is frame by frame Frame by frame you have to draw everything ONE. FRAME. AT. A TIME. (it takes forever) that’s why its [called] FRAME. BY. FRAME. you’ll get something like this (OH GOD I FORGOT SQUISHING ) 2D animation there’s “Tweening” and “Frame BY Frame” which consist of the 12 principles of animation: Key Frames. SQUASH and Stretch (cant believe i forgot squashing T-T) Anticipation and Timing Which are just the MAIN ones i use (look at the bg if you want the rest geez) Lets move on to 3D anIMaTiOn For 3D animation there is Modeling, Texturing, Rigging, Animating and Lighting here’s a video of a guy explaining [his animating process] Every animator has their own way of working, but for a beginner, it’s definitely a fail proof system. Step one: shooting a reference video. This is a very important and overlooked step. The thing is that people really think that they know how certain actions look like, and how long they’re going to take, but they’re often wrong. Physical action is something you need to analyze before starting to animate, especially if you’re a beginner. If you have a shot of a guy throwing a baseball, you better YouTube some reference video of pitchers throwing balls. Don’t assume you know what it looks like just because you’ve seen it before or did it yourself. Observing an action as an animator is completely different than doing it on your day to day. So for this tutorial, I decided to go with a guy winking at someone and pointing at them in kind of a silly way. So the first thing I did was shoot a reference video. Now that you have the references, it’s time to create your key poses of the shot. These poses are called key poses because they are the most important parts of the shot. These are the poses that, if someone saw just them alone, they would know exactly what’s going on in the shot. You better make sure you get those poses right. The next step is blocking. Once we’re happy with the poses, we start breaking down the movement from each pose to the next by adding inbetweens or breakdown poses or passing poses, there are many names for it. We keep doing that until the movement looks as good as it could be, while still staying in the step mode. Step mode is when you don’t allow computer interpolation between poses. So that’s why the animation looks kind of choppy and blocky. Step four is splining. Splining is a 3D animation term. It’s the process in which you convert the interpolation from step to spline. In other words, you make the computer connect the movement between each of your poses, and it makes the movement look smoother. The problem is that the computer doesn’t do a very good job at interpolating it. That’s why the better the blocking is, he better the spline version is going to look. This is how our shot looks right after pressing the spline button. smoothing and offset. Now that all our keys are on spline mode, we have some work to do. We need to clean up all the curves and make sure the movement looks smooth. It’s also a good idea to offset some of the actions otherwise it looks very stop and start, as if he’s doing all the motion at once. By the end of this step, your shot should look pretty solid, or even kind of finished. And then we have our last step: adding life. This step is the most fun, because you’re already done with the grunt work of animation, and it’s time to just add the fun stuff. The cool stuff. In this step, I just usually add small imperfections that add life to the character. Maybe an extra blink, or a mouth twitch. The difference between the last two steps is small, but very noticeable. but you may ask: “how would i use this in [my] works?” well, you can do something like this: thank you for listening~!! music: Mabel (cover) – Eve (I know that was cringe) [captions done at 1.30am. WHOOO!]

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