3. Staging – 12 Principles of Animation

3. Staging – 12 Principles of Animation


This video is based on the Twelve Principles of Animation as described by Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston. So that third principle of animation is
called Staging. Staging is the presentation of any idea so
that it is completely and unmistakably clear. This is a very broad principle because it
covers so many areas of animation. It can apply to acting, timing, camera
angle and position, and setting. So when you’re animating, you want to be in full control of where the audience is looking You’re essentially saying “look at this,
now look at this, and now look at this.” This control is
achieved through staging. All the elements of the scene work
together to move the viewer’s eyes around the screen Here’s an example of bad staging. The characters are competing for stage presence, so the viewer doesn’t know which one to look at. The camera has a lot to do with this. It’s important to know when to be close up and when to be far away Far away is good for big actions, while
close up is good for expressions. Don’t have the main action be off to the
side. It should be either in the center of the screen or on one of the thirds of the screen. If they’re facing to the side, there should be more empty space in the direction that they’re facing, unless someone is sneaking up behind them, in which case they would no longer be the main character of the shot. The main action of the scene should be
very clear and simple. It can’t be upstaged by other things
that are going on. This takes attention away from the main
point. It should also have proper timing. Let one action finish before the other
person starts their action, instead of overlapping them. Sometimes you need to insert pauses if
there’s something on screen that needs to be processed by the viewer, before moving on. Sometimes, if there’s
any text on the screen you should keep it on screen for as long
as it takes to read it out loud three times But it’s not just about controlling the
viewer’s eyes, it’s also about conveying ideas If the character is sad, for example, you want to make sure that the viewer knows that and feels that If someone’s house is supposed to be
very poor and decrepit go over the top to make sure that they
get it. And don’t have any objects that detract from that purpose Let’s take the scene and give it the
“staging treatment”. This fat guy’s eating pizza. The idea that we want to convey is that
he is a severe overeater So let’s set the stage more. Let give him more pizza, and put piles of pizza boxes behind him, and stains on his shirt. Let’s move the camera down below him to make him look bigger And let’s change his acting so that his
weight actually gets in the way of his eating so he can’t even reach for the soda without falling over now let’s make sure to time it right so
he notices the soda, and then reaches for it now the idea is very clear. So that’s all I have for staging, the next principle is called Straight Ahead and Pose to Pose so thanks for watching, and I’ll see you
guys in the next video!

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